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Smart Tips to Protect Yourself from Scams & Scammers

protect yourself from phone scams

Use the following tips to stay safe online, and safer on your phone:

Do not open suspicious emails, but if you should, do not click on any links.

Bad grammar and spelling are usually signs of a scam. Scammers do not know your name because they send multiple emails, or text messages, all at once, so they will often call you "dear customer", "dear madam" or say your email address instead of your name. This is usually a symptom. Never trust a suspicious caller on your phone, especially when the caller asks for confidential information.

Do not divulge personal information by email, text or phone call. The bank does not ask you for this information, either by phone or mail. Call them using the number you found yourself. If it sounds too good to be true, it will be.

Never send money to someone you do not know, no matter what they say. Many scammers try this on dating platforms, or social media. They will claim to "love you so much", but lack the finances to buy an airline ticket to "come be with you." Guess who will be asked to pay for the plane ticket?

Beware of scams that promise jobs, or ask for money for training purposes. Choose a trusted contact in your financial circle who can be contacted if your bank should suspect anything suspicious.

Register your number in the National Calling Directory to avoid cold calls. In this way, in addition to reducing harassment, you will have more chances to spot a scammer.

Visit www.donotcall.gov, or call (888) 382-1222. Report fraudsters, or attempted fraud, at www.consumerfinance.gov/complaint.

We continue to love YouTube and rank its award winning content as the Best to be found anywhere. To make your visit more enjoyable, be SURE to click the SKIP ADS button when it appears on screen, and click the BACK Button after each video concludes. You will then be returned to this page for your next video selection.

July 2024
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3 Devious Phone Scams Preying on Seniors

hang up the  phone

#1 - BEWARE - Scammers Deceiving the Grandparents

The grandparent scam is simple and insidious because it uses one of the most trusted assets of the elderly, their loving hearts. Scammers will call an elderly person and when the caller speaks, they will say something like, "Hey grandma, do you know who this is?"

When the unsuspecting grandparent wonders whose grandchild is calling, The most devious scammer will have set up a false identity without doing any basic research. The bewildered grandparent will have rattled off one or more names trying to correctly guess which grandchild is on the telephone.

Once "connected", the fake grandchild will often ask for money to solve unexpected financial problems (mortgage payments, car repair emergencies, crime victim while on a vacation trip, etc.). They will request the emergency money to be sent through Western Union or MoneyGram, which does not always require an ID to collect (just a secret code word) from the Sender. At the same time, the trickster asks the grandparents not to tell the parents because, "they will kill me".

While the collected revenue from such telephone scams can run into the hundreds of dollars, the fact that no research is required makes this scam one of the most common in the world. The cost is very small to the individual, but large enough to make life uncomfortable for the victimized grandparent until their next Social Security payday hits the bank.

#2 - The Zelle Scam - The "Fraud" Department is Calling!

Fraudsters are turning to Zelle, the peer-to-peer payment app, to easily steal money. The scammer may text, write or phone you pretending to work for the fraud department of your bank, or credit union. They will then say that a thief is trying to steal your money from Zelle and that they are directing you to easily "fix" the problem. They will then ask you to send money to you, through Zelle, so the traceable money will then go back into your bank account.

Starting in mid-2023, Zelle began paying back some of the fraudsters involved. However, you may not qualify for a refund, so it is important to be careful about this type of financial scam. No responsible finanancial institution will ever ask for your participation in such a convoluted scheme. Recognize it for what it is: a Scam.

#3 - Healthcare/Medicare/ Health Insurance Fraud

Any U.S. citizen or permanent resident over the age of 65 is eligible for Medicare, so there is rarely any need for a scammer to research a senior's private health insurance company to get money from them.

. In these types of scams, fraudsters pose as a Medicare representative to trick seniors into giving them their personal information, or they may offer seniors fake services at hospitals that work. They will phone with fake names (and usually thick foreign accents) wanting your personal information so they can provide "enhanced government benefits" through your Medicare insurance program.

They will then use your personal information (that you will provide simply by answering their intrusive questions, in order to bill Medicare for medical services rendered, and pocket the money.

Learn How to Hang Up! Do Not Take Bogus Calls from Strangers!

We continue to love YouTube and rank its award winning content as the Best to be found anywhere. To make your visit more enjoyable, be SURE to click the SKIP ADS button when it appears on screen, and click the BACK Button after each video concludes. You will then be returned to this page for your next video selection.

June 2024
A Free Lunch Often Becomes Quite Costly

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Expecting Student Loan Forgiveness?

Are you hearing a lot about federal student loans forgiveness in the news? You are not alone. After all, Scammers are enterprising deceivers and seemingly ready to pounce on new victims at the first opportunity.

You may soon receive a phone call from someone claiming to be affiliated with Federal Student Aid (FSA) or the Department of Education. They will say they are checking your eligibility for the new student loan forgiveness program and may know something about your circumstance, like your balance or account number. They will try to get your interest by saying the program is only available for a limited time. But this is all a scam. What else would you need to know in order to spot, and avoid, a scam like this?

award winning help

The only place to get help managing your federal student debt is StudentAid.gov. The FSA (and federal loan officer) will not pressure you to sign up for anything, but a scammer will seem relentless. Sometimes it is easier to find out what is true by learning to see what is not.

Do not rely on official labels or logos. Scammers use names, logos and symbols to make them look legitimate. Do not buy promises of special opportunities. There are no special opportunities for repayment plans or debt forgiveness programs. No one can force you to participate in a loan forgiveness program that you do not already qualify for to cancel your obligation. Use your FSA account dashboard to see what programs you may be eligible for.

Do not pay anything upfront. It is illegal for companies to charge you before they help you reduce, or eliminate, your student debt. But if you have to pay upfront, you may not be able to get help or pay your bills. Get free help managing your federal loans at StudentAid.gov/repay. If your loan is private, contact your loan officer immediately for assistance. Do not share your FSA ID login information. Only scammers say they need it to help you. If a fraudster gets hold of your FSA ID, they can remove you from your loan service – or even steal your identity.

We continue to love YouTube and rank its award winning content as the Best to be found anywhere. To make your visit more enjoyable, be SURE to click the SKIP ADS button when it appears on screen, and click the BACK Button after each video concludes. You will then be returned to this page for your next video selection.

May 2024
There is a Sucker Born Every Minute - P.T. Barnum

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College student accused in $1M credit card scam appears in court.


Couple wires $800,000 home down payment to scammer.

grandparents care

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